1917 The Russian Revolution, Reactions and Impact

The Russian Revolution of 1917 changed the world forever. For once, it appeared that the oppressed workers were within grasp of the levers of state power and for a while the prospect of permanently ending exploitation seemed a real possibility. The revolutionary mood swept across continents and its impact was felt far beyond the parties of the left and the organised labour movement. The revolution inspired writers, poets, intellectuals and philosophers as much as it did workers and activists. With this special Occasional Publication the Socialist History Society commemorates these momentous events of one hundred years ago with a series of specially written articles that examine the reactions to the revolution and its impact in different areas.… Read on ...

Climbing Mount Sinai: Noah Ablett 1883-1935

Tonypandy Miners on Strike 1910

Socialist History Occasional Publication 40
by ROBERT TURNBULL

Noah Ablett has been described as the ultimate organic intellectual. An accomplished autodidact, scholar, polemicist, orator and teacher; he was one of the most outstanding, but controversial labour activists to emerge from the period of unprecedented industrial, political and social turmoil which convulsed the South Wales coalfield in the years preceding the First World War. One of the authors of The Miners’ Next Step, Ablett’s premature death robbed the labour movement of one of its ablest advocates.

About the author
Robert Turnbull is a writer and historian.… Read on ...

Killing Communists in Havana

Jesús Menéndez, General Secretary of the Cuban Sugar Workers’ Federation

The Start of the Cold War in Latin America
by Steve Cushion

Socialist History Society Occasional Publication 39

The Cold War started early in Cuba, with anti-communist purges of the trade unions already under way by 1947. Corruption and government intervention succeeded in removing the left-wing leaders of many unions but, in those sectors where this approach failed, gunmen linked to the ruling party shot and killed a dozen leading trade union militants, including the General Secretary of the Cuban Sugar Workers’ Federation.

Based on material from the Cuban archives and confidential US State Department files, this SHS Occasional Publication examines the activities of the US government, the Mafia and the American Federation of Labor, as well as corrupt Cuban politicians and local gangsters, in this early episode of the Cold War.… Read on ...

SYLVIA PANKHURST, THE EASTER RISING AND THE WOMAN’S DREADNOUGHT

Irish Citizen Army

Socialist History Society Occasional Publication 38

In O’Connell Street and along Eden Quay the dust was still thick upon the ground, the air was heavy with burning, and dense clouds of smoke obscured the ruins. Even when the rain came, and after three days of it, they were still smouldering.
Woman’s Dreadnought, 13 May 1916

On Easter Monday 1916, a small group of committed Irish Republicans occupied buildings in central Dublin and declared their country’s independence from Britain. The tragic outcome of the Irish uprising was anxiously observed by members of the political left around the world. … Read on ...