Climbing Mount Sinai: Noah Ablett 1883-1935

Tonypandy Miners on Strike 1910

Socialist History Occasional Publication 40
by ROBERT TURNBULL

Noah Ablett has been described as the ultimate organic intellectual. An accomplished autodidact, scholar, polemicist, orator and teacher; he was one of the most outstanding, but controversial labour activists to emerge from the period of unprecedented industrial, political and social turmoil which convulsed the South Wales coalfield in the years preceding the First World War. One of the authors of The Miners’ Next Step, Ablett’s premature death robbed the labour movement of one of its ablest advocates.

About the author
Robert Turnbull is a writer and historian.… Read on ...

Anarchists and the City

From the Paris Commune of 1871
to the Occupy and Square movements
Speaker: Professor Carl Levy
Professor of Politics, Goldsmiths College

Socialist History Society Public Meeting
Saturday 18th March 2017 2pm
MARX MEMORIAL LIBRARY
37a Clerkenwell Green EC1R 0DU nearest tube Farringdon
FREE TO ATTEND – ALL WELCOME

Since the emergence of anarchism as an ideology and and a self-declared movement in the nineteenth century, the city and the urban commune have been central to the anarchist imagination and to anarchist socio-political action

Spycops and Strikers

Spycops and Strikers is part of a series of Grunwick 40 memorial events, organised in co-operation with the Special Branch Files Project, the Undercover Research Group and the Campaign Opposing Police Surveillance.

Wed 15 February 2017 19:00 – 21:00

more details and registration…Read on ...

Menshevik (Mis?)interpretations of the Russian Revolution

Saturday 21 January 2017, 2.00 p.m.
Marx House, 37a Clerkenwell Green,
London EC1 Nearest tube: Farringdon

Speaker: Francis King
Editor of Socialist History, lecturer in modern European history at East Anglia, and translator of Fedor Dan’s memoir.

Across the Russian empire, the fall of Tsar Nicholas in March 1917 suddenly thrust revolutionaries and socialists into positions of power and influence. For many years before, they had worked, organised and planned for this revolution. Now the time had come to put their perspectives and programmes to the test. Working in soviets, state bodies and committees across Russia in the first six months of the revolution, the social-democrats (Mensheviks) tried to shape events in line with how they supposed the revolution must develop – towards ‘freedom’ and a parliamentary republic.… Read on ...